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November 3, 2015

Zug, Switzerland, and Budapest, Hungary (November 3, 2015) – ImmunoGenes AG announced that it received a contract from a newly-formed consortium of leading Hungarian research groups to generate unique monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies using the company’s IMG-AbS™ technology. The consortium of four elite groups in the neurobiology and cell biology fields in Hungary recently won a CHF 2.4 million grant to discover new neurobiology and cell biology targets and hired ImmunoGenes to work with the consortium on the goals of the grant.

The grant, issued by the National Research, Development and Innovation Office of Hungary and awarded to Femtonics Ltd., the Hungarian Institute of Experimental Medicine of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, the Research Center for Natural Sciences of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, and the University of Szeged, will be for the "identification of new therapeutic, diagnostic and research targets in neurobiology and cell biology using superresolution immune-staining methods".

This task is perfectly suited for ImmunoGenes IMG-AbS™ technology, which uses genetically-engineered mice and rabbits that overexpress the neonatal Fc receptor for IgG (FcRn), and has previously demonstrated the ability to generate more diverse antigen-specific antibodies and mount a stronger immune response against weakly immunogenic targets compared with wild-type animals. ImmunoGenes will receive approximately CHF 465,000 over the period 2015-2018 for generating these antibodies.

“We are delighted to be working with this first-class consortium,” said Imre Kacskovics, Chief Executive Officer of ImmunoGenes. “We look forward to using our unique technology to help these leading institutions develop novel research targets for neurobiology and cell biology.”

"According to our excellent earlier experience with antibodies produced by ImmunoGenes, we were delighted to join forces with this company again to identify molecular mechanisms of various brain disorders. These are also among the central aims of the Hungarian Brain Research Program (HBRP), which is the largest program grant ever launched in Hungary, and the success of which largely depends on innovative tools such as those developed by ImmunoGenes" said Tamás Freund, president of the HBRP that is supported by 38 million Euros over 4 years.

June 30, 2015

Zug, Switzerland, and Budapest, Hungary (June 30, 2015) – ImmunoGenes AG announced the publication of an article in Frontiers in Immunology that provides new evidences to the numerous advantages of the company’s IMG-AbS™ technology, which uses genetically-engineered mice and rabbits that overexpress the neonatal Fc receptor for IgG (FcRn). The article, entitled “Overexpression of bovine FcRn in mice enhances T-dependent immune responses by amplifying T helper cell frequency and germinal center enlargement in the spleen” was published on June 30, 2015.

Previously, ImmunoGenes has shown that these genetically-engineered mice and rabbits are able to generate more diverse antigen-specific antibodies and mount a stronger immune response against weakly immunogenic targets compared with wild-type animals. With the publication of this article, the company now also demonstrates that immunization results in multifold-more activated, antigen-specific T helper cells, and significantly larger and more germinal centers in the spleen. The article also highlights the ability to raise antibodies against very low dose of antigen in the bFcRn transgenic mice compared with their wild-type controls.

“We are pleased to have the opportunity to publish this data in Frontiers in Immunology,” said Imre Kacskovics, Chief Executive Officer of ImmunoGenes. “These findings further demonstrate the advantage of our transgenic mice for antibody development against weakly immunogenic targets (e.g. GPCR, ion channels) and also for broader epitope recognition.”

The link to the journal article is available here.

May 6, 2015

Zug, Switzerland, and Budapest, Hungary (May 6, 2015) ImmunoGenes AG announced that the company received a notice of allowance from the Japanese Patent Office dated April 28, 2015, indicating the Japanese Patent Office intends to grant a patent to ImmunoGenes protecting the company’s core technology of using genetically-engineered animals to generate an improved immune response.

The notice of allowance is for the company's patent application filed as part of a Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT) IB2007/054770 for “Transgenic animal with enhanced immune response and method for the preparation therof”. With the notice of allowance, ImmunoGenes has been, or will be, granted patent protection for its core technology in Europe, Hong Kong, Australia, China, Canada and Japan. Patents remain pending in the United States.

Protected under the issued patents is ImmunoGenes’ IMG-AbS™ technology, which uses the company’s genetically-engineered mice and rabbits that overexpress the neonatal Fc receptor for IgG (FcRn). ImmunoGenes has shown that these genetically-engineered mice and rabbits are able to generate more diverse antigen-specific antibodies and mount a stronger immune response against weakly immunogenic targets compared with wild-type mice. As a result, the company’s animals are of value for researchers seeking to develop antibodies against challenging immunogenic targets or who would benefit from the capability of these animals to express a more diverse immune response against epitopes of an antigen, which is typically not part of the standard response pattern.

“We are pleased by the decision of the Japanese Patent Office to issue a notice of allowance protecting our core technology,” said Imre Kacskovics, Chief Executive Officer of ImmunoGenes. “This patent, joining the patents previously issued in other major markets, underscores the unique advantages offered by our FcRn-overexpressing mice and rabbits in developing antibodies against challenging antigens.”

January 20, 2015

Zug, Switzerland, and Budapest, Hungary (January 20, 2015) ImmunoGenes AG announced that the company has been selected to present its technology at the Keystone Symposia entitled: Antibodies as Drugs: Immunological Scaffolds as Therapeutics next month in Banff, Canada.

Imre Kacskovics, Scientific Founder and CEO of ImmunoGenes, will present "Transgenic Animals that Overexpress the Neonatal Fc Receptor (FcRn) Have Improved Antibody Generation at Workshop 2: New Library Design and Screening Technologies session on February 12, 2015, from 2:30 PM - 4:30 PM. More details are available at the following link.

Previously ImmunoGenes has shown that the companys genetically-engineered mice and rabbits that overexpress the neonatal Fc receptor for IgG (FcRn) are able to generate more diverse antigen-specific antibodies and mount a stronger immune response against weakly immunogenic targets compared with wild-type mice. As a result, the company's animals are of value for researchers seeking to develop antibodies against challenging immunogenic targets or who would benefit from the capability of these animals to express a more diverse immune response against epitopes of an antigen, which is typically not part of the standard response pattern.ImmunoGenes has recently licensed its transgenic mice to Kyowa Hakko Kirin Co., Ltd., Japan, for the research, development and commercialization of therapeutic antibodies. In addition, ImmunoGenes transgenic rabbits developed a unique antibody that were able to visualize the drastically reduced levels of CB1 cannabinoid receptors in the brain. This finding was recently published in Nature Neuroscience (8 December 2014).

ImmunoGenes has recently licensed its transgenic mice to Kyowa Hakko Kirin Co., Ltd., Japan, for the research, development and commercialization of therapeutic antibodies. In addition, ImmunoGenes transgenic rabbits developed a unique antibody that were able to visualize the drastically reduced levels of CB1 cannabinoid receptors in the brain. This finding was recently published in Nature Neuroscience (8 December 2014).

"We are very excited to present our latest data at the Keystone Symposia," said Dr. Kacskovics. "The fact that ImmunoGenes was selected for this presentation underscores the unique advantages offered by our FcRn-overexpressing mice and rabbits in developing antibodies against challenging antigens."

Parties interested in meeting with him at the Keystone Symposia should contact him at imre.kacskovics@immunogenes.com.